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WLDY-WJBL NEWS 5-21-20 Dry weather remains in place; however, we will start to see some clouds today. Highs will be in the mid 70s. Clouds appear to become more prevalent heading into Friday with south and southeast flow. Moisture will be on the increase, while a weak front will be located to our west. Though a shower may sneak into western areas by late in the day, chances look very low and the majority of our area will stay dry. The partly to mostly cloudy skies will drop temperatures just a couple degrees. We head into the holiday weekend with an increasing chance for at least scattered showers and thunderstorms, but there will still be plenty of opportunities to spend some time outdoors without having to worry about rain. Saturday will be partly sunny with a chance to see a shower or two while the actual front is not forecast to arrive until the second half of Sunday. This is when chances will be favored to see more organized thunderstorms and perhaps a low end severe weather threat. However, exact timing, coverage, and severity remains uncertain this far out. Still, it will feel a bit more like summer as temperatures reach about 80 and humidity levels increase to noticeable amounts. MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – Wisconsin now has more than 13,000 new coronavirus cases. After a relatively quiet couple of days, state testing identified a record 528 new patients since Tuesday afternoon. The state also received 6,591 test results, also a record. Eight percent of those came back positive, putting Wisconsin’s coronavirus case count at 13,413. That’s one of the highest percentages of positive results in the past two weeks, but well under the double-digit percentages at the beginning of May. 297 of the 528 new cases were tested in Milwaukee County. Fourteen more deaths related to COVID-19 were reported. That brings the death toll to 481. Currently, 3.5% of known cases were fatal, but that percentage has been falling. Fifty-one more COVID-19 patients were hospitalized in the past 24 hours. So far, 2,161 patients were hospitalized at some point during their treatment, or 16% of cases. There are 298 patients currently hospitalized, including 129 in ICU. CHIPPEWA COUNTY, Wis. (WEAU)– The Chippewa County Health Department held their weekly update for COVID-19 and currently has 43 positive cases. WEDNESDAY, MAY 20th UPDATE: 43 confirmed cases (increase of 7 from last week) 1,974 negative tests 31 out of isolation 12 monitoring 0 hospitalizations 22 cases over the age of 40, 21 under the age of 40 RUSK COUNTY (WEAU) – Colten Treu has been sentenced to jail for his Rusk County charges. Court records show Treu has been sentenced to 110 days in jail, which will be served at the same time as his Chippewa County sentence. Treu’s charge for possession of meth was dismissed but read in. Counts two and three are for drug possession-party to a crime. Charge four was amended to opearting with restricted controlled substance-third. Treu was sentenced after a company truck was crashed into the ditch off Highway 27 in Rusk County. The criminal complaint says Treu admitted to smoking pot before the crash. Drugs were found in the truck by investigators. CHIPPEWA COUNTY (BLOOMER) – Shortly after 12 Noon Wednesday, Rusk County received a report from the state regarding a stolen vehicle out of the City of Bloomer in Chippewa County. The vehicle was a Black colored Ford Escape with a MN. Plate. According to the report, the Suspect, David D. Menton, 36, and complainant purchased a large amount of Meth Tuesday in the Wausau Area and were possibly heading to the Duluth area. Menton has open cases for fleeing and eluding and past weapon charges. At about 12:30 this (Thursday) morning, the subject and vehicle were located at the MPS Airport and were in custody with the MSP PD. The dramatic slowing of the economy to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus decreased home sales in April even as prices continued to rise, according to the most recent review of the existing home market by the Wisconsin REALTORS Association. Existing home sales fell 6.9% in April, compared to April 2019 whereas the significant tightening of inventories drove the median price up 9.7% over the past 12 months to $214,000. Year to date home sales remained in positive territory after a good start to the year, rising 2.9% through the first four months of 2020 relative to that same period in 2019. Median prices continued to rise on a year to date basis, increasing 8.3 % to $200,000. In Rusk County, the median price in April was not available but in April of 2019 was $85,000. Year to date the median price was $142,116 in Rusk County compared to $84,000 last year. Sales in Rusk county was 5 in April compared to 12 in April of last year. Year to date sales in Rusk County was 36, compared to 45 last year. Since the time from an accepted contract to a closing can be 4 to 8 weeks, it’s only now that we’re seeing the effect of the coronavirus on monthly sales. SPARTA, Wis. (WEAU)– One firefighter was treated for an injury to his leg after a fire broke out in a the town of Leon. Sparta Fire Chief Mike Arnold says officials were dispatched to a house on Jamboree Road that was reported to be fully engulfed. All occupants were confirmed to be out of the house and the fire spread quickly. The house has extensive damage but some family possessions were saved and the house is insured, according to Arnold. The fire is believed to have started on the deck. The cause of the fire is still under investigation. WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 2.4 million people applied for U.S. unemployment benefits last week in the latest wave of layoffs from the viral outbreak that triggered widespread business shutdowns two months ago and sent the economy into a deep recession. Roughly 38.6 million people have now filed for jobless aid since the coronavirus forced millions of businesses to close their doors and shrink their workforces, the Labor Department said Thursday. The number of weekly applications has slowed for seven straight weeks, and last week the figures declined in 38 states and the District of Columbia. Yet historically, they remain immense — roughly 10 times the typical figure that prevailed before the virus struck. “While the steady decline in claims is good news, the labor market is still in terrible shape,” said Gus Faucher, chief economist at PNC Financial. The continuing stream of heavy job cuts reflects an economy that is sinking into the worst recession since the Great Depression. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimated this week that the economy is shrinking at a 38% annual rate in the April-June quarter. That would be by far the sharpest quarterly contraction on record

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