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WLDY-WJBL NEWS 4-16-20 Temperatures will remain chilly for mid-April for one more day, but at least it’s the start of a steady warming trend. Weak high pressure will generally hang on throughout the Upper Midwest, while the deep upper trough starts to relax and slowly lift back to the north. Cloud cover will be the trickiest part of the forecast as we are still looking at some cloud build up with daytime heating. Still, enough sunshine is expected to at least return temperatures back into the low 40’s Thursday and upper 40’s Friday. A light west breeze will be around both days, making it still feel a bit colder. The weekend will turn noticeably warmer as the wind flow shifts to the southwest. A cold front will be dropping out of Canada during the day, while bringing an increase in clouds through the afternoon. Right now the forecast remains dry, but there may be a few stray showers near the front into the evening hours. Winds may gust to 30 mph during the afternoon as temperatures reach for 60. The front will then pass, bringing some cooling for Sunday but it will be a dry and pleasant day with a partly to mostly sunny sky and highs in the lower 50’s. MADISON, Wis. (AP) Gov. Tony Evers is telling President Donald Trump that Wisconsin faces $2 billion in revenue losses due to skyrocketing unemployment and other hits to the economy caused by the coronavirus. Evers and the governors from Michigan and Pennsylvania sent Trump a letter Wednesday asking him to urge Congress to send $500 billion in budget aid to states and local governments. The letter was sent that same day that Evers signed a bill passed by the Republican-controlled Wisconsin Legislature that clears the way for spending about $2 billion the state is receiving in federal funds. MADISON, Wis. (WEAU) Here are the latest COVID-19 numbers for the state from the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. 39,326 negative tests (increase of 1329 from yesterday) 3,721 positive tests (increase of 166 from yesterday) 1,091 hospitalizations (increase of 42 from yesterday) 182 deaths (increase of 12 from yesterday) RUSK COUNTY – Rusk County has three cases, Price and Washburn counties, 1 each, 2 in Sawyer, 3 in Polk, 6 in Barron, 7 in Douglas, 10 in St Croix, 20 in Chippewa and 21 in Eau Claire County. The death toll from the coronavirus in the U.S. is nearing 31,000 on Thursday after President Donald Trump said the country passed its peak for new cases. The jump in the death toll, which stood at more than 26,000 Wednesday morning, comes after New York City implemented a new way of counting fatalities. The city is now including probable cases for which officials did not have a positive COVID-19 test but reason to believe it to be the cause of death. With nearly 7,000 confirmed deaths and just over 4,000 probable deaths, the city reports close to 11,000 fatalities. Not everyone counted in the increase died in the past 24 hours. Other states have similarly revised their numbers upward as they work to get a more accurate count. Connecticut on Wednesday saw its death toll jump when state officials indicated they had begun including people who died in their homes rather than just people who were in hospitals at the time of death. RUSK COUNTY – Wednesday afternoon at about 4 PM, the Rusk County dispatch received a 911 call reporting a 2 vehicle accident at County Highway P and County Highway G near Ladysmith. Rusk County deputies, Ladysmith Ambulance, and Ladysmith Fire Department were called to the scene. According to the report, a Ram 1500 was North bound on County Highway G and turning Left or West onto County Highway P. A Pontiac Grand Prix was stopped on County P at the stop sign and was turning Left or North onto County G and struck the Ram 1500. The lone driver of the Pontiac was cited for failure to yield right of way. A female passenger from the Ram 1500 was transported by ambulance to MMC-Ladysmith with minor injuries and precautions due to prior medical issues. COLUMBIA COUNTY, Wis. (WEAU) – Authorities in Portage, near Madison, say that two inmates have escaped from Columbia Correctional Institution, and are still on the run. The Columbia County Sheriff’s Office says 45-year-old Thomas Deering and 37-year-old James Newman escaped Thursday morning. Law Enforcement is encouraging people in the area to stay at home, lock their doors, and call 911 if you see these men. According to online records both men have a history of escaping custody. Deering was found guilty in Milwaukee County of burglary, kidnapping, and three counts of 2nd degree sexual assault in 2001. He was also convicted with intentionally escaping custody in 2003 and a battery in prison charge in 2015. Newman was convicted in 2009 for six charges of discharging a firearm in Brown County. Newman was also found guilty in Jackson County of kidnapping, theft and escaping custody in 2012. WASHINGTON (AP) — The ranks of Americans thrown out of work by the coronavirus ballooned Thursday to at least 22 million in just four weeks, an unprecedented collapse that has fueled widening protests and propelled President Donald Trump’s push to relax the nation’s social distancing guidelines. Trump planned to announce new recommendations later in the day to allow states to reopen, despite warnings from business leaders and governors that more testing and protective gear are needed first. The government said 5.2 million more people applied for unemployment benefits last week, bringing the running total to about 22 million out of a U.S. work force of roughly 159 million — easily the worst stretch of U.S. job losses on record. Some economists say the unemployment rate could reach 20% in April, the highest since the Great Depression of the 1930s. While some leaders and citizens around the U.S. have called on government to reopen stores, factories and schools, health authorities and many politicians warned that returning to normal is a distant goal and that lifting restrictions too soon could allow the virus to come storming back. (AP) — U.S. home-building activity collapsed in March as the coronavirus spread, with housing starts tumbling 22.3% from a month ago. The Commerce Department said Thursday that ground breakings occurred last month at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.2 million units, down from a 1.56 million pace in February. Construction of single-family houses fell 17.5%, while apartment and condo starts were off 32.1% from a month ago. All of this paints a bleak outlook for housing as the lockdown to contain COVID-19 have led more than 20 million Americans to lose their jobs in the past four weeks.

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