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WLDY-WJBL NEWS 4-14-20 A large trough is established over the north-central states and will keep cold air locked in for a few more days. Today we’ll start with at least some sun for a while but clouds will again build with a few more scattered afternoon/evening snow showers as the atmosphere destabilizes. Daytime highs will again likely only reach the mid 30’s, though winds will be a bit lighter overall. Another very cold night for April as we dip back down into the teens to start Wednesday morning, but we should remain above the record, which is 10° for the date. A slow warming will then commence on Wednesday and through the end of the week. The pattern will be stable with weak high pressure taking over. The main storm track will stay to our south, so no additional precipitation is in the forecast for a while. We can also expect a decent amount of sunshine, while some clouds may again mix in for the afternoon hours. Wednesday will reach to near 40, while Thursday and Friday will warm about 5 more degrees each day, taking us to around 50 as the work week ends. By then most of the snow should already be melted, thanks to the high sun angle here in April. RUSK COUNTY – MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Joe Biden has defeated Bernie Sanders in Wisconsin’s presidential primary, which was held last week during the coronavirus pandemic. Biden’s victory became academic after Sanders dropped out last week, one day after Wisconsin held in-person voting despite widespread concern over the health risks. Republican legislative leaders refused to delay the election, and the party won a court battle to keep the date, making Wisconsin an outlier from other states that postponed spring primaries. Returns weren’t allowed to be reported until Monday due to a quirk in the court battle over the election. In Rusk County Joe Biden received 1,135 votes and Bernie Sanders 347 votes. MADISON, Wis. (AP, WEAU)– Liberal Jill Karofsky wins 10-year seat on Wisconsin Supreme Court. Dane County Circuit Judge Jill Karofsky has defeated incumbent Justice Dan Kelly to win a 10-year seat on the state Supreme Court. The race was officially nonpartisan but Democrats backed Karofsky and Republicans supported Kelly. Karofsky was on the offensive for most of the campaign. She accused Kelly of being corrupt because he consistently sides with conservative groups before the court. Karofsky’s victory narrows the conservative majority on the court to 4-3 and gives liberals a chance to take control of the court the next time a seat comes up in 2023. In Rusk County – Daniel Kelly received 2,113 votes and Jill J. Karofsky got 1,507 votes. In the City of Ladysmith, for Mayor, Alan Christianson, Jr., got 411 votes, James West, 232 votes and Kalvin Vacho 47 votes. Alder. District 2 – Bill Morgan 52 votes and registered write-in Kelli Grotzinger 11. Alder District 4 – Gerard Schueller 70 votes and Al Christianson, Sr., 60 Alder District 6 – Al Hraban 71 votes and Ryan Heavey 12. In Rusk County Board contested races District 1 County Supervisor Terry Dusell 118 votes Peter Boss 114 votes District 5 Timothy Miller Write-in 28 Arlene Konops Write-in 15 District 12 – Jim Meyer 119 Roger Gierke 58 State Referendum in Rusk County Yes 2,613 No 831. Winter School District Referendum Yes 573 No 301 $4,000,000 MADISON, Wis. (AP, WEAU)– Wisconsin voters have approved amending the state constitution to guarantee crime victims more rights. The amendment easily passed in results counted Monday from last week’s election. The Wisconsin Constitution and state law already lay out a host of crime victim rights. The amendment gives victims the right to seal information that could be used to locate them; the right to be heard at plea and parole hearings; and the right to opt out of defense attorneys’ civil depositions. Supporters have dubbed the amendments “Marsy’s Law” for a California college student who was killed by an ex-boyfriend in 1983 RUSK COUNTY – Monday afternoon at about 1:20, Rusk County deputies served a warrant at a residence on Prairie Road, Tony. According to the report, a deputy was in contact with the subject. The warrant was valid and the subject was taken into custody and transported to the Rusk County jail. Wisconsin dairy farmers still must pay fees on milk they can’t sell and have to dump — and some are being publicly shamed, too. As the shelves at grocery stores and food pantries have been emptied, some dairy farmers have been publicly shamed for dumping milk. Meanwhile, they’ve also been assessed marketing fees for milk flushed down the drain. Altogether it’s added insult to injury, say Wisconsin farmers whose livelihood has been decimated by the sudden shutdown of restaurants, schools, sporting events, festivals and other markets for products such as milk, cheese, butter and ice cream. Because they dairy plant they sell to has more milk than they can process, the Elbe’s are forced to dump 25,000 gallons of milk a day from their 2400 milling cows. “It’s a mess right now. Farmers are very upset about this milk-dumping issue, and consumers are upset because they see grocery stores limiting the sales,” said dairy farmer Randy Roecker from Loganville. For more than a week, Golden E Dairy farm, near West Bend, has been dumping about 25,000 gallons of milk a day because processing plants, full to the brim, will not take it. Wisconsin’s dairy farmers and processors were blindsided by coronavirus shutdowns in the food-service industry. More than half of the state’s milk goes into food-service, and those sales have plummeted 70% during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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